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This woman’s awesome Pokémon Go CV is going to catch all the jobs

Got a Goldeen opportunity?

By Holly Brockwell August 12, 2016
jessrose

In a competitive, Brexit-tinged tech job market, it can be hard to stand out. You know your CV is a Dragonite, but when the hiring manager’s already read 400 today, it starts to look more like a Drowzee. So how do you get their attention? With the Ultra Ball of CVs, of course – the Pokémon Go resumé.

Kickass technologist Jessica Rose took advantage of the end of her Head of Developer Relations contract at DreamFactory to relaunch herself as a Pokémon – or “technology personmon,” as she puts it. With the help of artists Kate Holden and Shaz Jubeen, she created this trading-card-style summary of her experience:

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Neatly emphasising her skills and experience, the Pokémon Go CV is also super-shareable, which increases the chances that the Ponyta of employers will spot it in the wild. We love the little touches of geekery, like the mystery evolved form (we are dying to know what it looks like), and even the time.

The Pokémon Go resumé links to her pretty excellent URL, Jessica.Tech, with more detail about the kinds of tasks she’s Seaking and the ones that make her Snorlax. We caught up with Jessica to ask how her geeky CV came about.

Gadgette: What inspired this approach? Why a Pokémon Go CV?

Jessica: Like everyone else in the world, I’ve been playing Pokémon Go. While snagging my trillionth Pidgey I muttered a wish that grabbing a great role could be this easy, and decided to run with the idea.

What kind of job would be like Incense + Razz Berry to you?

Jessica: A role that lets me trade on the things I’m really great at with support for the skills I want to better develop would be a lure + incense + razzberry of a combo! I’m keen to find someplace where my outreach, management and public speaking skills could be an asset, while getting some time to pair program on great demos with a supportive team to help me gain confidence as I work to sharpen my generalist programming skills.

You’re a big advocate for women in tech – what can employers do to help them evolve to their most powerful form?

Jessica: The thing I see women in tech needing most from employers is a clearer understanding of what women’s lives look like, and shaping the whole of the employment experience to fit applicants and employees of all genders.

More inclusive language in job ads, data driven recruitment processes instead of “culture fit” or “gut feeling” and flexible working conditions that allow for creative collaboration would let talent of all types evolve.

We couldn’t agree more. If your business needs some fresh XP, don’t be a Slowbro – give her a job.


Images: Jessica Rose