13 viral videos you haven’t seen for ages

FENTON!

Last week in Friday 13 we looked at 13 products that had been pointlessly feminised. Now we turn our attention to viral videos. It’s been ten years since YouTube launched in 2005. Ten. Years. That explains why I can’t really remember a time when I wasn’t sharing stupid funny videos with my friends. Over the years, YouTube has got increasingly slick and professional and often your video won’t get a look in unless it’s been well-filmed and slickly edited, and may the internet gods help you if you dare to put something up that’s been filmed in the wrong aspect ratio.

That said, we were feeling a bit nostalgic this morning and decided to take you back through some of the best videos that ever went viral and drove you mental as they were continually funnelled into your email inbox by everyone you knew. Or maybe you weren’t old enough to see them (All Your Base was a revelation for me). Either way, in the spirit of Halloween, we’re raising the internet dead.

13) All Your Base

Origins

The phrase “All your base are belong to us” came from the opening dialogue of Zero Wing, a 16-bit shooter game from 1989. The whole thing developed from the creation of a GIF animation of the mistranslated speech which was initially popularised on the Something Awful message forums and snowballed from there.

Where are they now?

Lodged safe and sound in the internet Hall of Fame.

12) Charlie Bit Me

Origins

829,123,834. No, that’s not my phone number, that’s how many views this one video of adorable brothers Charlie and finger-muching Harry has clocked up since it was first uploaded by user HDCYT in 2007.

Where are they now?

You can still watch the adventures of Harry and Charlie to this day, as the YouTube channel is still going, with the last upload being only 5 months ago. They have a blog and Facebook account managed by their dad, and even a T-shirt range on Zazzle where prices start at £15.95, and presumably one of your fingers will cover the delivery.

11) Shoes

Origins

“Shoes” was created by Liam Kyle Sullivan and uploaded to YouTube in May 2006. It’s Sullivan himself who embodies completely the materialistic American teenage stereotype in his character Kelly. She’s bored by pretty much anything that isn’t shoes. It’s safe to say the video did pretty well since it was shown on Entertainment Weekly, chosen as one of the top 10 videos of 2007 by YouTube and even won a People’s Choice Award for “Favourite User-Generated Video” in 2008. The song went onto itunes in 2006, and has managed to rack up over 300,000 downloads.

Where are they now?

Liam did pretty well from this in his stand up comedy, he even appeared in TV shows like Gilmore Girls and 8 Simple Rules, but his YouTube channel hasn’t been updated since 2013, the merch shop on his site closed last year, and he hasn’t had anything new on IMDB since 2014. Who knows what’s happening?

10) Star Wars Kid

Origins

Star Wars Kid is the nickname given to Ghyslain Raza, a Canadian teenager who filmed himself fighting with a golf-ball retriever, as though it were a double-sided light saber. The video was uploaded without Raza knowing by three of his classmates in 2003 because kids are assholes. There are two kinds of people: people who have also done this, and people who are lying about having done this. Maybe not with a lightsaber, but you can be damn certain I’ve recreated some pirate sword fights and some wand duels in my spare time. Other people ruin these things with their inability to appreciate well-crafted fight choreography.

By the end of May 2003, the video was all over the mainstream media. Unfortunately, Raza was humiliated and finished school in a psychiatric ward. His parents filed a quarter million dollar harassment lawsuit against his classmates’ families for emotional and psychological damages. This was the dawn of a new internet, one where there was actually serious discussion to be had about privacy.

Where are they now?

A 2010 article in Motherboard revealed that Raza was then the president of the Patrimoine Trois-Rivières, a society dedicated to the conservation of his hometown, and that he was studying law at McGill University in Montreal. And a later interview in Canadian publication L’Actualite quoted Razza encouraging victims of harassment to stay strong, “overcome (their) shame” and find help. Good on you Razza.

9) Salad Fingers

Origins

We are so sorry. Salad Fingers is a ten episode series of videos by creator David Firth, first unleashed on the internet in 2004, that has to date garnered over 49 million views in its entirety. Salad Fingers makes for pretty fascinating viewing, creating an amazingly creepy environment without ever being overly violent. The video was at its most popular between 2004 and 2006 but it’s been on the decline in recent years, probably just because there are no new episodes being added. It will no doubt forever live on in the back of my mind.

Where are they now?

Salad Fingers’ creator David Firth still makes videos on YouTube and they do very well. You can keep up to date on David’s work via Twitter, where he’s most active.

8) Crazy Frog Brothers

Origins

There have been numerous versions of this video uploaded, so it’s impossible to know when it first appeared or how many views it’s actually accumulated, but the oldest video we can find is from 2006 with over 17 million views. The video is basically two brothers raving out their hearts and souls to Crazy Frog. It’s so perfect and absolutely necessary viewing for getting you ready to face a night out.

Where are they now?

Raving into the sunset. Actually, we’re not sure, but we hope we’re right.

7) Rickroll

Origins

Look, if you don’t click on it, it doesn’t count, we promise. But you will, because who can resist those dulcet tones? Rickroll is just the old bait-and-switch move of getting someone to click a link to “Never Gonna Give You Up” by disguising it as something else. It started on 4Chan in 2007, when someone pretended to post a link to the highly anticipated Grand Theft Auto IV trailer. Pure. Evil.

Where are they now?

Well, Rick Astley is still performing, in fact he was doing a Spain tour only last month. As for the Rickroll trend, what is it they say? As long as the trolls are still trolling the Rick will never stop rolling. Always click with caution, because even Apple could get you.

6) Sneezing Baby Panda

Origin

Sneezing Baby Panda was first uploaded in 2006 and has since gotten over 218 million views. It’s pretty obvious why. It even got a film that proved much less popular. Maybe they should have uploaded it to YouTube.

Where are they now?

We’re not sure of the current location of this adorable panda, but we hope it’s thriving and in the possession of lots of tissues.

5) David After the Dentist

Origin

Since it was uploaded in 2009, this video has gotten over 131 million views. In May 2008, David DeVore took his seven-year-old son, David DeVore Jr. because his mum wasn’t able to take him. DeVore decided to film David before and after the procedure to show her later. After the surgery was completed, DeVore filmed David’s deep contemplations of life. The video spread over a variety of news sites and tech blogs, becoming the second most watched video of 2009, after Susan Boyle’s Britains Got Talent performance.

Where are they now?

According to the family’s blog, David is starting High School this Autumn. Apparently he enjoys sports and video games. Turns out David’s pretty normal when he’s not just out of dental surgery.

4) Prison Thriller Dance

Origins

In 2007, the inmates of Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center (CPDRC), a maximum security prison in Cebu, the Philippines, imitated the zombie dance featured in the music video of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” The genius behind the idea was the prison’s chief, Byron F. Garcia. Garcia’s initial aim was to make exercise more enjoyable for the prisoners to keep them mentally and physically active.

Where are they now?

Since their most popular performance, the prisoners of CPDRC have done many more including Jai Ho and Do the Hustle. As a result of their internet fame, many visitors come to CPDRC to view the prisoners perform from viewing platforms surrounding the exercise yard. At the jail, visitors can have their pictures taken with the inmates. They can also buy souvenir prison shirts. Seriously. Apparently, the inmates are getting a foundation to be maintained by the officials of different prison cells. The money raised by the inmates’ dancing and YouTube fame is to go to their trust fund and used for emergencies and other needs. It’s good to see the effort being put into rehabilitation continues.

3) Fenton the Dog

Origin

On November 21st, 2011, Redditor seangp posted a video to the marijuana enthusiast r/trees subreddit titled “FENTON YOU LITTLE SHIT!”. The thread received managed to reach the front page and received over 7,000 up votes in 24 hours. There was a lot of debate on whether or not the dog was called Benton or Fenton but, honestly, we all know it’s Fenton.

Where are they now?

After Fenton’s owner was unmasked in 2011, he said he just wanted to move past the incident and it seems he has since we haven’t heard from him or the mischievous Fenton since. Hope you’re still raising hell, Fenton, because you’re certainly still making me double over with laughter.

2) Numa Numa guy

Origin

Numa Numa is a video created by New Jersey amateur videographer Gary Brolsma of him lip synching to the song “Dragosea din tei” by Moldovan band O-Zone. It first appeared online in 2004 on Newgrounds and pretty much exploded in popularity, spawning parodies and re-enactments.

Where are they now?

You’ll be glad to know Gary Brolsma is doing well, and you can keep up to date with his latest adventures on his website, where he states he’s incredibly honored by all the cool things he’s been able to do because of his “silly little video”. He’s currently in a band called The Backroom Deal, and has a gaming channel on YouTube called Limit Break Arcade. Unfortunately O-Zone have broken up as of 2005, but they created a classic.

1) The Viral Song

Origins

Created by YouTube star Tobuscus in 2013, The Viral song is your instructional guide to getting on one of these lists in the future, which of course has over 25 million views itself. When a viral video about making viral videos begins to go viral it’s time to take a step back. The genre’s gone too meta. We’ve put this down here because we know you’re thirsting for internet fame after that list, so have at it.

Where are they now?

Tobuscus still makes incredibly popular videos, like he has done since 2006.

More Friday 13 lists for you: 13 pointlessly feminised products, 13 products that highlight the fragility of masculinity, 13 TV theme songs you probably haven’t heard for years, and 13 product code names that should have stuck.


Main Image: screenshot